Counseling the absent and hopeless?

Being a good career counselor is tricky: You want to be a goal-oriented, action-focused, “active listener”. You want to be savvy and professional, but also sympathetic and understanding. You need to be culturally competent and universally approachable (as clients range from Arabic speaking housewives who want to become nurses to Puerto Rican kids spitting hip hop lingo and trying desperately to stay in GED class) yet you must be conscious of boundaries. (see ‘The peculiar case of Mrs. H’)

BUT YOU CAN’T DO SHIT WHEN THEY DON’T SHOW UP!!!

Time and time again you see the same behavior: Clients are looking for a way out of the tough situations that have befallen them, they display initial enthusiasm, perhaps they even have an appointment or two of working with you, but then they up and disappear. Then I end up posting on my blog instead of doing other stuff I have to do, because it all consists of busy work. I’m unhappy because WORST CASE SCENARIO I should be getting paid AT LEAST twice as much to do busy work. Meanwhile, clients are unhappy because they are jobless and confused!

~**(&^*&^%&^%$#4##@%^&!!!

UPDATE: OK…I’ve calmed down now

The client whose absence sent me into psychotic spiral (see above) finally showed up, albeit 2 hours late. Resume was prepared, other clients were seen, I am now busy at work and as such most conclude this sad and rambling blog post. Phew.

Before I go, I should take a sober moment to talk about learned helplessness. This is the behaviorist theory that people can lose motivation after life has shat upon them for long enough. Perhaps, once they’ve succumbed to this feeling, showing up on time feels pointless.

I can understand that. It’s still annoying though.

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One Response to “Counseling the absent and hopeless?”

  1. tinman64 Says:

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    Respectfully,

    Mark Tinney
    President
    JOBehaviors

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